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About TAPPI Journal

An internationally recognized technical publication for over 60 years, TAPPI Journal (TJ) publishes the latest and most relevant research on the forest products and related industries in digital format. A stringent peer-review process and distinguished editorial board of academic and industry experts set TAPPI Journal apart as a reliable source for impactful basic and applied research and technical reviews. TAPPI Journal is going Open Access. Read more.

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Editorial: TAPPI Journal 2019 Best Research Paper runner-up focuses on persistent issue of cracking at the fold in coated papers, TAPPI Journal May 2020

May 01, 2020

ABSTRACT: TAPPI and the TAPPI Journal (TJ) Editorial Board would like congratulate the authors of the runner-up paper to the 2019 TAPPI Journal Best Research Paper Award: Seyyed Mohammad Hashemi Dajan, Douglas W. Bousfield, and Mehdi Tajvidi. Their paper: "Cracking at the fold in double layer coated paper the influence of latex and starch composition," appeared on p. 93 of the February 2019 issue. This coating research was recognized by the TJ Editorial Board for its innovation, creativity, scientific merit, and clear expression of ideas.

Effects of a PFI refiner’s operational parameters on the swellability of recycled fiber, TAPPI Journal May 2020

May 01, 2020

ABSTRACT: This paper presents data on the effects of operational parameters (number of revolutions, linear pressure, and gap) of the PFI refiner on the swellability of recycled fiber, which was characterized by water retention value (WRV). The results showed that the increase of recycled fiber’s WRV was proportional to the number of revolutions and the linear pressure, but inversely proportional to the gap. The mathematical relation between these parameters and the fiber WRV could be described by an empirical model for gaps greater than 0.1 mm. Scanning electron microscopic images of fiber morphology showed that the basic framework of fibers could be maintained with the gap greater than 0.1 mm, but was destroyed with smaller gaps. This model provides a technical reference for quantitative control of refining treatment and an effective method for improving recycled fiber quality.

Fundamental understanding of removal of liquid thin film trapped between fibers in the paper drying process: A microscopic approach, TAPPI Journal May 2020

May 01, 2020

ABSTRACT: In the fabrication of paper, a slurry with cellulose fibers and other matter is drained, pressed, and dried. The latter step requires considerable energy consumption. In the structure of wet paper, there are two different types of water: free water and bound water. Free water can be removed most effectively. However, removing bound water consumes a large portion of energy during the process. The focus of this paper is on the intermediate stage of the drying process, from free water toward bound water where the remaining free water is present on the surfaces of the fibers in the form of a liquid film. For simplicity, the drying process considered in this study corresponds to pure convective drying through the paper sheet. The physics of removing a thin liquid film trapped between fibers in the paper drying process is explored. The film is assumed to be incompressible, viscous, and subject to evaporation, thermocapillarity, and surface tension. By using a volume of fluid (VOF) model, the effect of the previously mentioned parameters on drying behavior of the thin film is investigated.

Alternative “green” lime kiln fuels: Part I—Pulping/recovery byproducts, TAPPI Journal May 2020

May 01, 2020

ABSTRACT: This paper is the first of a two-part series on “green” lime kiln fuels. The first part of this work reviews the use of pulp mill and recovery byproducts as either full or partial replacement of oil or natural gas in the kiln. The second part reviews the use of various forms of woody biomass, bio-oils, gasification, and hydrogen as potential carbon neutral or carbon-free lime kiln fuels.

Alternative “green” lime kiln fuels: Part II—Woody biomass, bio-oils, gasification, and hydrogen, TAPPI Journal May 2020

May 01, 2020

ABSTRACT: This paper is the second of a two-part series on “green” lime kiln fuels. The first part of this work reviews the use of pulp mill and recovery byproducts as either full or partial replacement of oil or natural gas in the kiln. The second part reviews the use of various forms of woody biomass, bio-oils, gasification and hydrogen as potential carbon neutral or carbon-free lime kiln fuels. Several of these options require specialized burners to supply the fuel to the kiln and high-quality metallurgy to withstand the acidic conditions of the fuel.